How a little split-level can help define a space

This home in Toronto, Canada, has a split level main floor.

Photography by Bob Gundu

 

When Architects Luc Bouliane were designing this contemporary townhome in Toronto, Canada, they decided to create a split-level between the kitchen and living areas.

 

This home in Toronto, Canada, has a split level main floor.

Photography by Bob Gundu

By including a split-level, they were able to define the living area, making it somewhat, but not completely separate from the kitchen and breakfast nook.

This home in Toronto, Canada, has a split level main floor.

Photography by Bob Gundu

As the overall space has plenty of windows, by having the split-level define spaces instead of wall, light can flow through the entire interior uninterrupted.

This home in Toronto, Canada, has a split level main floor.

Photography by Bob Gundu

The split-level also allows the space to be kept open, allowing the sight lines and views to also be uninterrupted.

This home in Toronto, Canada, has a split level main floor.

Photography by Bob Gundu

Even though the cabinetry flows from the living area to the kitchen, the two spaces still feel slightly separate because of the split-level between them.

This home in Toronto, Canada, has a split level main floor.

Photography by Bob Gundu

Here’s the view from the front of the house, looking towards the kitchen and backyard. From this angle, you can’t even see the living area furniture, as it’s tucked away behind the wall next to the breakfast nook.

This home in Toronto, Canada, has a split level main floor.

Photography by Bob Gundu

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